Professor Prof

crofethr:

denali-winter:

BAM.

I have never hit reblog so fast in my LIFE.

hobgoblinhero:

hanari-502:

wastelandbanditorion:

This guy’s vines give me life

Thomas Sanders is a gift to this world

I have a theory on Thomas Sanders that he can control minds and rather than using this gift for evil, he uses it to make funny vines. Like, a classroom full of kids? mind control. The teacher of the class? mind control. Cop pulls him over? you better believe that dude is gonna sing Don’t Stop Believing with him, mind control. 

elis-magic-catnado:

jpnvines:

僕の”フリーカラー”ペン。My “Free Color” pen. #ginzablow 〜 銀三郎

My “Free Color” pen. My “Free Color” pen. #ginzablow 〜 銀三郎

YO WHAT THE FUCK

Following a new blog like “I should reblog some of their better posts all in a row so that they know I’m a blogger of discerning tastes”

dogfluid:

karenhurley:

This campaign is great, really makes you look closer instead of just and quick stereotypical glance 

GSR Entrance Hall System

Advertising Agency: SPR Agency, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil Via

Woah

kizatchi:

thanks cnn

kizatchi:

thanks cnn

gallifreyburning:

When someone reblogs an ancient post from your blog, one that wasn’t even tagged  

image

feminist-space:

mpreg-tony:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.
English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 
This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 
A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 
Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

Thank got someone pointed this out… I didn’t have the energy to do it. 

Agreed with urulokid. And I certainly like urulokid’s version of the ad.

feminist-space:

mpreg-tony:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.

English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 

This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 

A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 

Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

image

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

Thank got someone pointed this out… I didn’t have the energy to do it. 

Agreed with urulokid. And I certainly like urulokid’s version of the ad.

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted